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dc.creatorDe Luca, Jacopoes
dc.creatorZaffaroni-Caorsi, Valentinaes
dc.creatorBosch, Jaimees
dc.creatorLlusia, Diegoes
dc.creatorBeltrán Gala, Juan Franciscoes
dc.creatorMárquez, Rafaeles
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-04T16:44:28Z
dc.date.available2023-01-04T16:44:28Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationDe Luca, J., Zaffaroni-Caorsi, V., Bosch, J., Llusia, D., Beltrán Gala, J.F. y Márquez, R. (2022). Effect of natural abiotic soil vibrations, rainfall and wind on anuran calling behavior: a test with captive-bred midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans). Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00359-022-01596-5.
dc.identifier.issn0340-7594es
dc.identifier.issn1432-1351es
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11441/140942
dc.description.abstractAnurans are known to detect vibrations, but few studies explore relationships between vibrations and resultant behaviors. We studied the reaction of calling captive-bred male midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans) to the randomized playback of a vibrational crescendo stimulus train. We considered two sources of natural abiotic vibrational stimuli: rainfall and wind. Rainfall was expected to induce calling and wind was expected to inhibit it. Playback experiments with two synthetic tones (200 Hz and 300 Hz) tested the sensitivity to pure tones and could possibly reveal a hearing sensitivity trend between these frequencies. The toads did not increase call rate in response to rainfall vibrations and only one of the five wind stimulus levels caused a significant decrease in call rate. This limited response could be explained, because the tested toads came from a captive population, where emergence may not be mediated by rainfall vibrations. We found that A. obstetricans is highly sensitive to very low frequencies, which could explain the sensitivity observed to vibrational stimuli. Playback of a random crescendo stimulus train proves to be a valid approach for addressing behavioral questions. However, the use of a captive population may have been a limitation in the clarity of the results.es
dc.formatapplication/pdfes
dc.format.extent9 p.es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherSpringer Naturees
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectBehaviores
dc.subjectBiotremologyes
dc.subjectCommunicationes
dc.subjectHearinges
dc.subjectSeismic signalses
dc.titleEffect of natural abiotic soil vibrations, rainfall and wind on anuran calling behavior: a test with captive-bred midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans)es
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dcterms.identifierhttps://ror.org/03yxnpp24
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversidad de Sevilla. Departamento de Zoologíaes
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00359-022-01596-5es
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00359-022-01596-5es
dc.journaltitleJournal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiologyes

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